Archive | May, 2014

The B-52’s

31 May

 

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June Bugs

31 May

Phyllophaga is a very large genus (more than 260 species) of New World scarab beetles in the subfamily Melolonthinae. Common names for this genus and many other related genera in the subfamily Melolonthinae are May beetles, June bugs, and June beetles.[1][2] They range in size from 12 to 35 millimetres (0.47 to 1.38 in)[1][2] and are blackish or reddish-brown in colour, without prominent markings, and often rather hairy ventrally. These beetles are nocturnal, coming to lights in great numbers.

The generic name is derived from the Greek words phyllon (φυλλον), which means “leaf”, and phagos (φαγος), which means “eater”, with a plural ending.

I tell you there is more going on here than meets the eye.

31 May

 

Ratt(us) – He rat on us.

31 May

 

The Captain and Tennille

31 May

 

Muskrat What?

31 May

The muskrat (Ondatra zibethicus), the only species in genus Ondatra and tribe Ondatrini, is a medium-sized semiaquatic rodent native to North America, and is an introduced species in parts of Europe, Asia, and South America. The muskrat is found in wetlands over a wide range of climates and habitats. It has important effects on the ecology of wetlands[2] and is a resource of food and fur for humans.

The muskrat is the largest species in the subfamily Arvicolinae, which includes 142 other species of rodents, mostly voles and lemmings. Muskrats are referred to as “rats” in a general sense because they are medium-sized rodents with an adaptable lifestyle and an omnivorous diet. They are not, however, so-called “true rats”, that is, members of the genus Rattus.

Let ’em in

31 May