Romulan Warbird Decloaking and Firing

23 Jul

Asteroid Collision

23 Jul

star-trek-tng-cloaking

Star Trek TNG Cloaking

 

Fleetwood Mac – Tusk (Dodger Stadium with the USC Trojan Marching Band – 1979)

23 Jul

Image 23 Jul

Pallas Athena

23 Jul

Pallas Athena

The tradition regarding Athena’s parentage involves some of her more mysterious epithets: Pallas, as in the ancient-Greek Παλλάς Ἀθήνη (also Pallantias) and Tritogeneia (also Trito, Tritonis, Tritoneia, Tritogenes). A distant archaic separate entity named Pallas is invoked as Athena’s father, sister, foster sister, companion, or opponent in battle. One of these is Pallas, a daughter of Triton (a sea god) and, according to some later sources, a childhood friend of Athena.[61]

In every case, Athena kills Pallas, accidentally, and thereby gains the name for herself. In one telling, they practice the arts of war together until one day they have a falling out. As Pallas is about to strike Athena, Zeus intervenes. With Pallas stunned by a blow from Zeus, Athena takes advantage and kills her. Distraught over what she has done, Athena takes the name Pallas for herself.

When Pallas is Athena’s father, the events, including her birth, are located near a body of water named Triton or Tritonis. When Pallas is Athena’s sister or foster-sister, Athena’s father or foster-father isTriton, the son and herald of Poseidon. Athena may be called the daughter of Poseidon and a nymph named Tritonis, without involving Pallas. Likewise, Pallas may be Athena’s father or opponent, without involving Triton.[62] On this topic, Walter Burkert says “she is the Pallas of Athens, Pallas Athenaie, just as Hera of Argos is Here Argeie.[63] For the Athenians, Burkert notes, Athena was simply “the Goddess”, hē theós (ἡ θεός), certainly an ancient title.

In fact, “Pallas” is derived either from πάλλω, “brandish” (as a weapon), or, more likely, from παλλακίς and related words, “youth, young woman.”[64] The story that Athena kills a friend or relation called “Pallas” and takes the name to honor her is only attested quite late, in Apollodorus and Philodemus. It seems to have been invented to explain the name

Pallas

23 Jul

 

Pallas, third largest asteroid in the asteroid belt and the second such object to be discovered, by the German astronomer and physician Wilhelm Olberson March 28, 1802, following the discovery of Ceres the year before. It is named after Pallas Athena, the Greek goddess of wisdom.

Pallas’s orbital inclination of 34.8° is rather large, but its moderate orbital eccentricity (0.23), mean distance from the Sun of 2.77 astronomical units(about 414 million km [257 million miles]), and orbital period of 4.62 years are typical for asteroids located between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter. The discoveries of Ceres and Pallas, together with that of two more asteroids (Juno and Vesta) over the next five years, gave rise to the surprisingly long-lived but no longer generally accepted idea that the asteroids are remnants of the “missing” planet between Mars and Jupiter predicted by Bode’s law—i.e., that they were pieces of an actual planet that broke up.

Pallas has an ellipsoidal shape with radial dimensions of 275 × 258 × 238 km, equivalent to a sphere with a diameter of 513 km—i.e., about 15 percent of the diameter of the Moon. Pallas’s albedo (reflectivity) is 0.15. Its mass is about 1.2 × 1020 kg, and its density is about 3.4 grams per cubic cm (about that of the Moon). Pallas turns once on its axis every 7.8 hours. Compositionally, Pallas resembles the carbonaceous chondrite meteorites. Its surface is known to contain hydrated minerals.

Image 23 Jul